My Notebook

My notebook is where I keep random notes, experiments and bits of research. Some of these become full posts in time, others stay here for prosperity.

1

Exploration of tubes, shapes and colours

Exploration of tubes, shapes and colours

A simple experiment looking at lines, shapes and colours would work together.

I created a simple 3D tube and layered them in a rough curve. What I was interested in was how the ends of the tubes would interact with a background of the same colour.

It’s interesting how the curve seems to break when the top matches the colour of the background.

2

Experimenting with “hello”

Experimenting with “hello”

I was looking for ways to use type to break a page up. I wanted to use ascenders and descenders to create grids on a page.

The one I settled on is above. It was pretty obvious in hindsight, although it popped out in the middle of my brainstorming. Maybe I was avoiding the obvious!

One alternative had the descender coming off the O. It didn’t work – it ended up making it look like a q.

Hello experiment on Affinity Designer

Another variation on the o motif. With a little more work on the O it might work. Running a vertical away from the e almost worked.

Experiment with hello on affinity designer

3

A celebration of my Nokia 8110 “Banana Phone”

A celebration of my Nokia 8110 “Banana Phone”

Over a year ago I decided I’d had enough of being tethered to an iPhone. I ditched it – recycled it to one of my daughters, and bought a Nokia 8110. It’s a design classic and a thing of beauty.

It has form and shape. There are curves and changing textures. It sits easily in the palm of my hand and it’s pretty good at making and receiving phone calls too.

The graphic is a homage to my favourite mobile phone.

4

Architectural drawing experiment

Architectural drawing experiment

An experiment using Affinity Designer to create a perspective based drawing. Part of my ongoing efforts to improve my illustration skills with some simple, quick sketches.

Initial perspective frame

Started with a basic set of perspective guides. These are created from a series of overlaid triangle shapes. The height and apex can be adjusted to create the correct perspective point. This is easier if you change the triangle to “curves” in designer and drag the apex node to where you need it.

Perspective sketch of a simple block  building

The build sketched. This is simple, so I used a simple block building.

Note to self: do elements on the same perspective line at the same time. I made the mistake of drawing one of the windows on the right side at a different time to the left, which threw it out. Same mistake not made next time!

Filled in image on the full page

Detail filled in. I used one of my “city skyline” templates for the background. Not 100% convinced about the shading.

Job done. Took about an hour. Key lessons:

  • converting a triangle to curves and moving the apex around is far easier than trying to adjust a triangle shape
  • use multiple “triangles” to make drawing shapes easier
  • do elements on the same perspective line at the same time (e.g. do all the windows on the same floor at once!)

5

Affinity Designer’s vector brush tool

Affinity Designer’s vector brush tool

Affinity Designer on iPad is a neat piece of software. It’s where much of my work starts life, although I might use the desktop version for finer finishing details like kerning and pixel placement.

This is an experiment with the Vector brush. I rotoscoped an image I took a year or so ago. The aim wasn’t to create photo-realism, rather to test the accuracy of the tool and a style I was playing with.

There was a second objective. In a year or so I’ll go through a tech refresh, which will probably mean replacing my iPad and MacBook Pro with a single, 2-in-1 laptop. I wanted to test whether Affinity Designer was a reasonable replacement for Adobe’s Procreate.

There’s a few problems with it, not least it sometimes decides where it wants to place nodes rather than where I want them. Being able to go back and edit the line is a bonus though.

6

Lightbulbs

Lightbulbs

Experiment to create a perception of shadow and light. Part of my ongoing quest to fight back against “flat” design in illustration.

7

Someone inside Huffpost thought this was “good design”

Someone inside Huffpost thought this was “good design”

I can’t imagine the conversation that took place when someone said, “Yeah, let’s have the video fly out and start playing automagically”. It’s not like we haven’t distracted them enough with the crowded adverts, subscribe box and the fixed top menu.

Don’t be like Huffpost.

8

Choices – an experimental illustration

Choices – an experimental illustration

I’m still evolving my illustration skills. They’re a bit weak, but things are getting better.

9

Alternative to a Bar Chart

Alternative to a Bar Chart

Bar charts can be a bit boring. I wanted to create something with a bit of movement in it. The angle each circle runs to is in correct proportion to its value, using the UK’s €24 as a baseline at 270 degrees.

The numbers are taken from a Europa.eu report. I’m not 100% convinced they’re right, but they are what they are. In any event, my aim wasn’t to represent specific numbers, rather test the design.

I think it stands out, and they’re not too difficult to create. Could be a useful addition to the toolkit.

10

Experiments divider for Instagram

Experiments divider for Instagram

My Instagram account was a mess. I chucked all sorts of rubbish on it: photos, illustrations and graphic design got equal billing. Mind you, I treated it more like a dumping ground than a serious social network because it is rubbish. It’s one of the reasons I deleted it (Facebook’s ownership was a bigger one)

When I shared my poster experiments I decided to segment them clearly in the timeline. So I created a mock bit of XML to carve them out. Everything works backwards, so I had to share the end of the experiment tag first, and the start last.

11

Excluding categories from your blog in WordPress

If you want to suppress a particular category from your WordPress blog it’s quite easy to do. All you need is the following snippet of code:

function exclude_category_home( $query ) {
// I exclude a specific category from the home page.
if ( $query->is_home ) {
$query->set( ‘cat’, ‘-139’ );
}
return $query;
}

add_filter( ‘pre_get_posts’, ‘exclude_category_home’ );

The function tells the index query to omit category 139. On my blog, 139 is the “notebook” category where I keep my random thoughts and notes that don’t fit well in a blog structure. I suggest you use the ID as its more reliable than trying to infer it from the category name.

To find your category’s ID, edit the category in WordPress and look at the URL:

/wp-admin/term.php?taxonomy=category&tag_ID=139&post_type=post&wp_http_referer=%2Fwp-admin%2Fedit-tags.php%3Ftaxonomy%3Dcategory

The bit in bold (tag_ID=139) gives you the ID.

“add_filter” tells WordPress to call the function before the loop.

I’ve put this code in my site’s plugin so it doesn’t get lost the next time I change the theme.

It’s a useful piece of code if you do article spinning or want to keep certain things off your blog.

About Ross A Hall

I help companies make the most of content. Some people call me a writer, others a content manager. I prefer "someone who gets results".

Need a hand? Get in touch.

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